Plumbuita Monastery

Plumbuita Monastery

Bucharest municipality, Colentina Road. Convent for monks.
Dedication day: “Saint Ioan’s the Baptizer Birthday”, 6 January.

Originally, the monastic establishment was constructed during the reign of Petru cel Tanar (Peter the Young) Voivode between 1559 and1568 and underwent many changes up until 1647, when Matei Basarab Voivode had it thoroughly reconstructed, adding a princely residence is an outstanding witness of the civil architecture of the 17th century.
The plan of the church building is apsidal, consisting of three apses that are placed across from the church entrance – one of them above the altar, and the other two above the lateral sides of the naos. The tower is placed right above the naos; the church has been provided with two towers above the pronaos, following the architectural pattern of the Dealu Monastery, a pattern that was taken over by several other religious dwellings during the reign of Matei Basarab. There have been preserved several segments of the original paintings, as well as stone frames in the Moldavian style. The kitchen of the monastery is the oldest of its kind in all of the monastic establishments of Walachia.

Constructed in the shape of an irregular polygon, the gate tower (which was erected between 1802 and1806) guards the monastery grounds.
The Plumbuita Monastery has a significant role in the history of Bucharest, from the end of the 16th century onwards. Here was the first printing house of the city set up in 1573. The princely residence shelters a museum that displays liturgical art objects dating from the 16th century and spanning over three centuries – up until the 19th century.

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